Adultification

Adultification

I recently came across an Atlantic article by the child psychologist Erica Christakis, in which she discusses a concept she terms “adultification”—that is, the attribution of adult traits and behaviors and ways of thinking to children. On its surface, the article—which focuses on active shooter drills in elementary schools, of all things—seems very far removed from things like test prep and college admissions; however, as I read through the piece, I couldn’t help but notice a link. I think Christakis really nails this phenomenon in a way I haven’t seen elsewhere. As she writes: (more…)

The impossibility of “authenticity” in college admissions

The impossibility of “authenticity” in college admissions

In the social sciences, there is a principle known as Campbell’s Law, which states the following:

“The more any quantitative social indicator is used for social decision-making, the more subject it will be to corruption pressures and the more apt it will be to distort and corrupt the social processes it is intended to monitor.”

Or, said more simply, “When a measure becomes a target, it ceases to be a good measure.”

Although selective colleges assess applicants holistically rather than according to strict numerical metrics, I think that a modified version of this rule is in fact very relevant to the admissions process. (more…)

Interview with a tutor: Larry Krieger

Interview with a tutor: Larry Krieger

Tell us about your company.

My company is named LarryPrep. It consists of just one person – me!

How did you get started in tutoring and what is your favorite part about it?

We have to turn the clock back to 1992 in Edison, New Jersey. At that time I was the Social Studies Supervisor for the Edison Public Schools. Dr. Kresky, the Assistant Superintendent for Curriculum, called an emergency meeting of all supervisors to develop an action plan to counter the decline in district SAT scores. The other supervisors blamed a variety of factors ranging from harsh scoring scales to unmotivated students. Finally, I volunteered to teach an after school “Crash Course.” That afternoon I drove to nearby Princeton and bought a number of SAT prep books including a College Board book with 10 real SATs. I spent the next week poring over the books. I then created a series of after school lessons focusing on vocabulary and critical reading. Verbal scores rose an average of 40 points! As the expression goes, the rest is history. Soon Dr. K scheduled me to teach a Crash Course at both high schools and during the summer. I love the challenge of working with students to achieve a common goal of mastering a difficult test. I especially enjoy working with high school students. Their energy and commitment are contagious! (more…)

Notice regarding SAT Grammar books sold on Amazon (3/22/19)

Notice regarding SAT Grammar books sold on Amazon (3/22/19)

Update (3/28/19): The Critical Reader received the books purchased from third-party sellers and confirmed that they were in fact counterfeits. A complaint was filed with Amazon, and the offending sellers now appear to have been removed. 

3/22/19: If you are planning to purchase The Ultimate Guide to SAT Grammar, 4th Edition, from Amazon, please be aware that the main listing is being periodically given to third-party sellers who may be exploiting the Fulfilled by Amazon option to sell illegally printed copies of the book.

As a result of changes in 2017 to Amazon’s selling policy, The Critical Reader no longer supplies to most wholesalers or third-party Amazon resellers. As a result, there is no legal way for Amazon resellers to obtain our books in large quantities. (To read about my ongoing battle with Amazon over the Buy Box, click here.)

My colleague Michael Cerro, author of For the Love of ACT Science, recently had his Amazon account hijacked this way; the books sold were clearly reproduced from scans. I am waiting to see to see whether this is the case for my books as well, but in the meantime, if you want to guarantee receipt of an authentic book that contains the most up-to-date content, please make sure that the seller is listed as Amazon or The Critical Reader.  

At this time, only the main grammar guide seems to be affected; Amazon is still listed as the main seller for the grammar workbook and the reading book.

In the meantime, if you plan to purchase this item from Amazon, please take the extra 30 seconds to check that Amazon is listed as the main seller. If it isn’t, go to”More buying choices,” click on the “New” link and select either Amazon or The Critical Reader. You can also purchase directly from The Critical Reader via the Books page.

 

Interview with a tutor: Richard McManus (The Fluency Factory)

Interview with a tutor: Richard McManus (The Fluency Factory)

Bio

Richard McManus is a committed behavioral executive who has designed and delivered training programs for executives, managers and teachers. His mission is to increase the ability of USA schools and teachers to teach reading to all students.

Richard  founded The Fluency Factory after 20 years of dreaming, thinking and planning. He is and always will be committed to serving all students — both struggling students and high achieving students. He created a system of fluency charts to measure skills and build the love of learning. The charts provide a direct measurement that can be communicated immediately to the student. They can see their learning from minute to minute, day to day, week to week, in clear, graphic terms. Seeing this progress gives the student the confidence that he or she can do more, and that learning does not have to stop, or be bound by present skill deficits (more…)

The politics of conjunctions

The politics of conjunctions

Back around 2013, when I was writing the original edition of The Critical Reader, I happened across research showing that one of the primary differences between teenagers’ writing and that of adults lies in the use of concessions—words like however and nevertheless and until, which are used to signal the introduction of an objection or a conflicting point. The adult writers used these types of words consistently, but they were largely absent from the students’ papers. I’ve thought about the implications of that fact in a general way before, but as I’ve recently come to realize, I’ve never really thought them through. This post is my attempt to do so. (more…)